Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
Navigate Up
EnglishFrancais
Current Year Centre for Addiction
and Mental Health

CAMH study shows global estimates of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder among children

TORONTO, August 21, 2017 – Globally, nearly eight out of every 1,000 children in the general population is estimated to have Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), according to a new study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH).
 
In addition, it is estimated that one out of 13 women who consumed any alcohol at any point or frequency during pregnancy delivered a child with FASD.
 
The study, published today in JAMA Pediatrics, estimates the prevalence – or the frequency that FASD occurs – for children from birth to age 16 in 187 countries.
 
“FASD prevalence estimates are essential to effectively prioritize and plan health care for children with FASD, who are often misdiagnosed,” says Dr. Svetlana Popova, Senior Scientist in CAMH’s Institute for Mental Health Policy Research. “Most of these children will require lifelong care, so the earlier they have access to appropriate therapy and supports, the better their long-term health and social outcomes will be.”
 
FASD is an umbrella term that describes a range of effects that can occur in someone whose mother consumed alcohol during pregnancy.  As the fetus develops, the brain is particularly vulnerable to alcohol’s damaging effects, which can lead to physical, mental, behavioral and learning disabilities.
 
For many countries, these are the first-ever estimates of FASD. Some notable figures:
  • Canada has eight cases of FASD per 1,000 children
  • The U.S. has 15 cases of FASD per 1,000 children
  • The European Region has the highest levels worldwide, at nearly 20 cases of FASD per 1,000 children
  • The Eastern Mediterranean Region has the lowest FASD prevalence
  • In 76 countries, more than one out of 100 young people has FASD.
 
The researchers also found that FASD occurred more frequently among children in care (such as foster care or orphanages), in the criminal justice system, in psychiatric care and aboriginal young people, compared to the general population.
 
“There is a need for targeted screening and diagnosis for these high-risk populations, as well as interventions to prevent alcohol use among mothers of children with FASD in relation to subsequent pregnancies,” says Dr. Popova. 
 
The study was a meta-analysis, which involved reviewing all existing studies in order to determine FASD levels by country. For countries lacking studies, the estimate was based on data prediction methods. This involved using data on the prevalence of alcohol use during pregnancy by country, determined in another 2017 study published by Dr. Popova’s team in the Lancet Global Health. Without the excellent interdisciplinary teamwork of young and senior investigators, these studies would not be possible, says Dr. Popova. 
 
There are existing measures that could be adopted to help prevent alcohol consumption during pregnancy and thus, FASD, says Dr. Popova. These include public health messages about the risks of drinking alcohol during pregnancy, and routine screening by health care professionals to detect alcohol consumption before or at early stages pregnancy. Brief interventions to address problems with alcohol should be provided to all women of child-bearing age where appropriate.
 
Links:
 
-30-
 
The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) is Canada's largest mental health and addiction teaching hospital, as well as one of the world's leading research centres in its field. CAMH combines clinical care, research, education, policy development and health promotion to help transform the lives of people affected by mental health and addiction issues. CAMH is fully affiliated with the University of Toronto, and is a Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization Collaborating Centre. For more information, please follow @CAMHnews and @CAMHResearch on Twitter.
 
For further information or to arrange an interview please contact:
Sean O'Malley
Media Relations, CAMH
416 535-8501 ext. 36663
 
 
CAMH Switchboard 416-535-8501
CAMH General Information Toronto: 416-595-6111 Toll Free: 1-800-463-6273
Connex Ontario Help Lines
Queen St.
1001 Queen St. W
Toronto, ON
M6J 1H4
Russell St.
33 Russell St.
Toronto, ON
M5S 2S1
College St.
250 College St.
Toronto, ON
M5T 1R8
Ten offices across Ontario